Today's Quote


“If people let government decide what foods they eat and what medicines they take, their bodies will soon be in as sorry a state as are the souls of those who live under tyranny.” Thomas Jefferson

Monday, May 24, 2010

How I Make Butter from Goat Millk

I had a reader ask on another post about how I make butter from my goat milk. It is an easy process although a bit tedious since I don't have any of the fancy equipment like cream separators. Each day I collect the cream off the previous day's milk. I then place this into a container (quart size) that I keep in the freezer for cream collection. When the container is full, I then take it out and let it thaw out. Then I divide it between 2 quart mason jars. Put the lids on and shake, shake, shake. This is a good time to dance around the house with your 3 year old, they love it and you are still working. The cream will start to clump together and then you will have a large ball of butter in the jar. Next, poor the mixture through a strainer lined with clean muslin. You can collect the liquid to feed to the chickens if you like or use in bread recipes. Next I place the butter in a bowl and start washing it with ice water or cold water from the fridge. regular tapwater melts the butter. just keep washing the butter ans squishing it around until the water runs off clear. So the process is wash, pour off and wash again, until the water poured off is clear. Then salt the butter or not depending on taste and place in clean container. I keep mine on the counter as it doesn't last long around here and gets hard in the fridge. The key thing to making this butter is to wash it really well. If you don't get all the leftover milk out of the butter it will sour. It also doesn't make much. I suppose I get about a 1/4 pound give or take from doing this. I think some of it also depends on what kind of goats you have. My nubians give more cream than my nubian/saanen, so that may be why folks who own other breeds simply can't get butter this way. Nubians and Nigerian dwarfs have the highest butterfat content in the dairy goat world. That is the reason that I chose my nubies. Now it will be interesting to see what my Boer/Nubian gives in cream since boers supposedly have very high fat in their milk.So if you have trouble getting any cream from your milk after it has stood in the fridge for 24 hours or so, it may be the breed of goat that you have and the fact that they simply don't have a high cream content. Good luck in your buttermaking!

6 comments:

Kelly said...

I read that you can churn whole goats milk and eventually get butter too. I've yet to try it, but plan to. We just added two nubian/boer crosses to our herd and one is ready to learn to milk. The other is due in June. Their teats are different than my Alpines.

Kat said...

Yes you can. That does require having a churn though which is something I don't yet have. You would need something that could handle a larger volume of milk. A half gallon of milk will not yield very much butter, so you would definitely need a good sized churn to make it worth your while. Blessings, Kat

Kelly said...

I just happen to have an old fashioned paddle churn that looks like it will hold half a gallon. I bought it off ebay when Elsie was coming into milk, but she never let me milk her enough to use it.

Kat said...

Ok, it's official......I am jealous! I would love to have one of those churns. Let us know how it works out. Blessings, Kat

Kelly said...

Keep an eye on ebay-I got mine cheap compared to antique store prices.

Anonymous said...

Thanks! cindy Lau